Mandating Prescription Contraception Coverage: Effects on Contraception Consumption and Preventive Health Services

Kerri M. Raissian, Leonard M. Lopoo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

While recent national discussions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) made the introduction of mandated contraceptive coverage within health insurance policies seem like a novel idea, it is not new at all. Since the late 1990s, 29 states have mandated that insurance providers include prescription contraceptive supplies and, in some instances, associated contraceptive services in their coverage. We use state-level policy variation to generate both difference-in-differences and triple difference estimates to determine if women in states with state-level contraception supply or contraception supply and services insurance mandates experienced changes in their utilization of contraception and preventive health care services. We find a positive relationship between these policies and prescription contraception use for those with low educational attainment, but the results are not robust to a variety of specifications. Our results also show an increase in the consumption of preventive health services for women with low educational attainment as a result of these health insurance mandates. We conclude by discussing the implications for the ACA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)481-510
Number of pages30
JournalPopulation Research and Policy Review
Volume34
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 27 2015

Keywords

  • Contraception
  • Health insurance mandates
  • Preventive healthcare

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Demography
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

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