Majority versus minority religious status and diasporic nationalism: Indian American advocacy organisations

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Studies of the homeland-oriented activism of diasporic groups focus on cases where those who share national origins also share common political interests. But other literature indicates that ethnic majority and minority groups may have different attitudes towards their homelands. This paper examines how majority and minority religious status in the homeland affects the foreign policy activism of immigrant organisations. It also examines how competing groups mobilising around foreign policy concerns frame their issues in such a way as to resonate with their Western audiences. Using examples of the mobilisation of Indian American groups around religious issues in India, it demonstrates that there are fundamental differences in the concerns and goals of Hindu American organisations and those representing Muslims, Sikhs and Christian Americans of Indian ancestry. These differences often result in opposing patterns of mobilisation around homeland issues.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalNations and Nationalism
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2016

Keywords

  • Diasporic nationalism
  • Indian Americans
  • Majority and minority ethnic groups
  • Religion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Political Science and International Relations
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

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