Low-income minority seniors' enrollment in a cybercafé: Psychological barriers to crossing the digital divide

Younbo Jung, Wei Peng, Meghan Moran, S. A. Jin, Margaret McLaughlin, Michael Cody, Maryalice Jordan-Marsh, Julie Albright, Merril Silverstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Scopus citations

Abstract

Investigated were why some low income, predominantly immigrant seniors (n=91) choose to enroll in free training and start to use computers and the Internet while others choose not to enroll. The study was conducted in collaboration with a senior center in downtown Los Angeles that provides free Internet access and training to its seniors. The results suggest that psychological variables (e.g., computer anxiety, computer self-efficacy, and aging anxiety) are stronger predictors of older adults' enrollment than their age or actual experience in using computers. Discussed are ways to motivate seniors to participate in computer training by reducing potential barriers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)193-212
Number of pages20
JournalEducational Gerontology
Volume36
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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