Links between parenting styles, parent-child academic interaction, parent-school interaction, and early academic skills and social behaviors in young children of English-speaking Caribbean immigrants

Jaipaul L. Roopnarine, Ambika Krishnakumar, Aysegul Metindogan, Melanie Evans

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

64 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined the influence of parenting styles, parent-child academic involvement at home, and parent-school contact on academic skills and social behaviors among kindergarten-age children of Caribbean immigrants. Seventy immigrant mothers and fathers participated in the study. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that fathers' authoritarian parenting style was negatively associated with and father-school contact was positively associated with receptive skills, vocabulary, and composite scores over and above that of mothers' contributions in these areas. Fathers' authoritative parenting style and father-child academic interaction at home were positively related to children's social behaviors. Mothers' authoritarian parenting style was negatively and mother-school contact was positively associated with children's social behaviors. Analyses indicated that fathers' parenting carried the weight of influence over mothers' parenting for facilitating both child academic skills and social behaviors. The roles of parenting styles, parent-academic activities, and parent-school contacts in early schooling are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)238-252
Number of pages15
JournalEarly Childhood Research Quarterly
Volume21
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2 2006

Keywords

  • Academic activities
  • Academic skills
  • Caribbean immigrant families
  • Parenting styles
  • School contact
  • Social behaviors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

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