Linear systems analysis of the ciliary steering behavior associated with negative-phototaxis in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

Keith Josef, Jureepan Saranak, Kenneth W. Foster

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

In response to light stimulation Chlamydomonas reinhardtii changes the beating frequency, beating pattern, and beating synchrony of the trans and cis cilia to steer the freely-swimming cell relative to light sources. To understand the cell steering behavior the impulse responses of the beating frequency and stroke velocity of each cilium have been obtained with high temporal resolution on cells held with a micropipette. Interestingly the response of each cilium is quite different. The trans cilium responds with less delay than the cis cilium for both beating frequency and stroke velocity. For light stimulation at 2 Hz, the critical cell-rotation frequency, both responses of the trans and cis cilia are about 180° out of phase. The trans-cilium beating frequency response peaks at a stimulus frequency of 5-6 Hz, higher than the cis at 1-2 Hz. The stroke velocities of the trans and cis cilia have the same stimulus-frequency response (∼2 Hz), but the trans cilium has a shorter delay than the cis. The times to maximum response are much shorter than the time for a rotation of the cell. The use of two different approaches that enable the trans cilium to respond ahead of the cis for both the beating frequency and stroke velocity responses suggests the importance of both responses to phototaxis. Internal cell processing responsible for the time course of the responses is proposed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)758-777
Number of pages20
JournalCell Motility and the Cytoskeleton
Volume63
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2006

Keywords

  • Dynamic response network
  • Flagella/cilia
  • Motility
  • Phototaxis
  • Response functions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Structural Biology
  • Cell Biology

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