'LET'S HAVE A DANCE': STAGING SHAKESPEARE IN RESTORATION LONDON

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

When we think of Shakespeares tragedy Macbeth, we might recall the famous soliloquy upon a dagger or Lady Macbeths compulsive hand washing. We do not think of showstopping musical numbers. And yet, for audiences in Restoration London, the musical witches in Macbeth were a big draw. As diarist Samuel Pepys observed, [it is] one of the best plays for a stage, and variety of dancing and music, that ever I saw (19 April 1667). This chapter considers the dramaturgical strategies Restoration-era adapters used when making space for music, through an analysis of Davenants Macbeth (1663/1664), Dryden/Davenants The Tempest (1667; rev. Shadwell, 1674), Purcells The Fairy-Queen (1692), and Gildons Measure for Measure (1700). As innovative as these adaptations were, not everything was new: I also consider Restoration Shakespeare as palimpsest. Just as traces of Shakespeares plays co-existed alongside newly composed lines of text, older songs were retained or their memory lingered.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationThe Oxford Handbook of Shakespeare and Music
PublisherOxford University Press
Pages387-408
Number of pages22
ISBN (Electronic)9780190945145
ISBN (Print)9780190498788
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2022

Keywords

  • Charles Gildon
  • Henry Purcell
  • Macbeth
  • Measure for Measure
  • opera
  • The Fairy Queen
  • The Tempest
  • Thomas Shadwell
  • William Davenant
  • William Shakespeare

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities(all)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of ''LET'S HAVE A DANCE': STAGING SHAKESPEARE IN RESTORATION LONDON'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this