Lead Exposure in Newly Resettled Pediatric Refugees in Syracuse, NY

Christina D. Lupone, Danielle Daniels, Dawn Lammert, Robyn Borsuk, Travis Hobart, Sandra D Lane, Andrea Shaw

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Lead is a major environmental toxin that presents numerous health consequences for children. Refugee children are at a risk of lead poisoning post-resettlement due to urban housing and environmental inequalities stemming from lack of funding, legislation, and advocacy. This article addresses lead exposure upon arrival and post-resettlement in 705 refugee children (age 0–16 years) attending a university clinic in Syracuse, NY, a city with a large refugee population. 17% of the newly arrived children had elevated blood lead levels (BLLs) (≥ 5 µg/dL); 10% had elevated BLL upon follow-up; 8.3% of the children’s follow-up elevated BLL were new exposures. 30% were found to have increased BLL at follow-up regardless of arrival status. An analysis of new exposures found a significant proportion of children would have been missed on routine screening that targets children < 2 years old. Primary prevention efforts are needed to prevent exposure and address risks to improve the health of all children locally, including newly resettled refugees.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Immigrant and Minority Health
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Refugees
Pediatrics
Lead Poisoning
Primary Prevention
Legislation
Lead
Population

Keywords

  • Anemia
  • Environmental inequalities
  • Lead exposure
  • Pediatric
  • Refugee

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Lead Exposure in Newly Resettled Pediatric Refugees in Syracuse, NY. / Lupone, Christina D.; Daniels, Danielle; Lammert, Dawn; Borsuk, Robyn; Hobart, Travis; Lane, Sandra D; Shaw, Andrea.

In: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lupone, Christina D. ; Daniels, Danielle ; Lammert, Dawn ; Borsuk, Robyn ; Hobart, Travis ; Lane, Sandra D ; Shaw, Andrea. / Lead Exposure in Newly Resettled Pediatric Refugees in Syracuse, NY. In: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health. 2019.
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