Latinos Report Higher Rates of Cognitive Impairment than U.S.-Born Whites, But Rates Vary Between Latino Subgroups

Claire Pendergrast, Marc Garcia, Catherine Garcia

Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticle

Abstract

Cognitive impairment is a major public health issue that affects older adults’ quality of life and independence. Among older adults, U.S. Latinos have higher rates of cognitive impairment than U.S.-born Whites. This brief describes differences in the prevalence and age patterns of self-reported cognitive impairment between Latinos aged 60 and older living in the U.S. and U.S.-born non-Latino Whites, and within Latino subgroups (U.S.-born Mexicans, foreign-born Mexicans, island-born Puerto Ricans, and foreign-born Cubans). Findings show higher rates of cognitive impairment among U.S. Latinos than among non-Latino Whites, with especially high rates among island-born Puerto Ricans and both U.S.- and foreign-born Mexicans. To address these disparities, policymakers and health care providers must advance culturally relevant programs and policies that promote healthy cognitive aging among older Latino subgroups.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Specialist publicationLerner Center for Public Health Promotion: Population Health Research Brief Series
StatePublished - 2022

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Latinos Report Higher Rates of Cognitive Impairment than U.S.-Born Whites, But Rates Vary Between Latino Subgroups'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this