Late-career entrepreneurship, income and quality of life

Teemu Kautonen, Ewald Kibler, Maria Minniti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Late-career transitions to entrepreneurship are discussed as a promising way to address some of the problematic implications of population aging. By extending employment choice theory to simultaneously account for career stage and for non-monetary rewards from entrepreneurship, we investigate how late-career transitions from organizational employment to entrepreneurship influence the returns from the monetary (income) and non-monetary (quality of life) components of an individual's utility. Using data from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing, our empirical analysis shows that for late-career individuals, starting a business is positively associated with change in quality of life and negatively associated with change in income.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)318-333
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Business Venturing
Volume32
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2017

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Aging of materials
Industry
Entrepreneurship
Quality of life
Income
Career transition
Longitudinal study
Reward
Empirical analysis
Career stage
Choice theory
Population aging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business and International Management
  • Management of Technology and Innovation

Cite this

Late-career entrepreneurship, income and quality of life. / Kautonen, Teemu; Kibler, Ewald; Minniti, Maria.

In: Journal of Business Venturing, Vol. 32, No. 3, 01.05.2017, p. 318-333.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kautonen, Teemu ; Kibler, Ewald ; Minniti, Maria. / Late-career entrepreneurship, income and quality of life. In: Journal of Business Venturing. 2017 ; Vol. 32, No. 3. pp. 318-333.
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