It takes at least two: Male partner factors, racial/ethnic disparity, and chlamydia trachomatis among pregnant women

Jessica Weisz, Sara Lozyniak, Sandra D. Lane, Robert Silverman, Kathy de Mott, Martha A. Wojtowycz, Richard H. Aubry, Emilia H. Koumans

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), the most prevalent sexually transmitted infection in the United States, disproportionately infects women and people of color. This study aimed to identify risk factors for racial and ethnic disparities for CT infection, re-infection, and persistent infection among pregnant women. We present a secondary analysis of births from a retrospective cohort study in Syracuse, NY from January 2000 through March 2002. African American women [OR 3.35 CI (2.29, 4.92)], Latin American women [OR 4.35 CI (2.52, 7.48)], unmarried women [OR 7.57 CI (4.38, 13.10)], and teen mothers [OR 3.87 CI (2.91, 5.16)] demonstrated statistically significant increased risk for infection. In multivariate analyses that included male partner variables, father's race/ethnicity but not the mother's race/ethnicity remained statistically associated with CT. Despite near universal rates of screening pregnant women, challenges to CT control remain and reflect barriers to testing and treatment of male partners.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)871-885
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved
Volume22
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2011

Keywords

  • Chlamydia trachomatis
  • Male partner factors
  • Pregnancy
  • Racial/ethnic disparity
  • Social determinants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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