It takes a village: A test of the creative class, social capital, and human capital theories

Michele Hoyman, Christopher Faricy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

124 Scopus citations

Abstract

Richard Florida argues that the "creative class" is inextricably connected with surges in urban growth. This article, using data from 276 metropolitan statistical areas, empirically tests the creative class theory as compared to the human and social capital models of economic growth. Our results demonstrate that the creative class is not related to growth, whereas human capital predicts economic growth and development and social capital predicts average wage but not job growth. Additionally, we found that clusters of universities correlated highly with economic growth. Our findings should warn policy makers against the use of "creative" strategies for urban economic development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)311-333
Number of pages23
JournalUrban Affairs Review
Volume44
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Creative class
  • Human capital
  • Social capital
  • Urban economic development

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Urban Studies

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