Is increased modularity associated with increased fretting and corrosion damage in metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty devices? A retrieval study

Genymphas B. Higgs, Josa A. Hanzlik, Daniel W. MacDonald, Jeremy L. Gilbert, Clare M. Rimnac, Steven M. Kurtz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

113 Scopus citations

Abstract

This retrieval study documents taper damage at modular interfaces in retrieved MOM THA systems and investigates if increased modularity is associated with increased fretting and corrosion. One hundred thirty-four (134) heads and 60 stems (41 modular necks) of 8 different bearing designs (5 manufacturers) were analyzed. Damage at the shell-liner interface of 18 modular CoCr acetabular liners and the corresponding 11 acetabular shells was also evaluated. The results of this study support the hypothesis that fretting and corrosion damage occurs at a variety of modular component interfaces in contemporary MOM THAs. We also found that modularity of the femoral stem was associated with increased damage at the head. An analysis of component and patient variables revealed that dissimilar alloy pairing, larger head sizes, increased medio-lateral offsets and longer neck moment arms were all associated with increased taper damage at the modular interfaces.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2-6
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Arthroplasty
Volume28
Issue number8 SUPPL
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2013

Keywords

  • Corrosion
  • Fretting
  • Metal on metal
  • Modularity
  • Total hip arthroplasty

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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