Investigating user disclosure of sensitive information: An extended ELM theory

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examines the cognitive and decision-making processes that occur during and after the introduction of a security warning message. Elaboration likelihood model (ELM) posits that with each message, an individual undergoes the process of persuasion in two slightly different ways. We extend ELM in the privacy literature by including privacy concerns to evaluate how information privacy concerns influence attitude. We examined individuals' attitude changes in pre-and post-security warning messages and the likelihood of disclosure/non-disclosure. By using the concepts of high risk and low risk treatments, we discovered three theoretical opportunities that motivated this behavior. Individuals who used their central routes to process information spent more time in making decisions and were less likely to take risks. When exposed to the same treatment, individuals who saw the cues and then the literature opted against disclosure. This shows that their final decision was influenced by the central route processing system.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAmericas Conference on Information Systems 2018
Subtitle of host publicationDigital Disruption, AMCIS 2018
PublisherAssociation for Information Systems
ISBN (Print)9780996683166
StatePublished - 2018
Externally publishedYes
Event24th Americas Conference on Information Systems 2018: Digital Disruption, AMCIS 2018 - New Orleans, United States
Duration: Aug 16 2018Aug 18 2018

Publication series

NameAmericas Conference on Information Systems 2018: Digital Disruption, AMCIS 2018

Other

Other24th Americas Conference on Information Systems 2018: Digital Disruption, AMCIS 2018
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityNew Orleans
Period8/16/188/18/18

Keywords

  • Central and peripheral routes
  • Elaboration likelihood model
  • Information security
  • Privacy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Information Systems

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Investigating user disclosure of sensitive information: An extended ELM theory'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this