Introducing expanding hypertext based on working memory capacity and the feeling of disorientation: Tailored communication through effective hypertext design

Moon J. Lee, Matthew C. Tedder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate how text formats affect readers' recall and feeling of disorientation based on their working memory capacities and past experience with hypertext. A post-test only experiment was conducted. A new hybrid hypertext, expanding hypertext, was proposed and tested with 201 college students. Among the participants who were low in hypertext experience, those who read the expanding hypertext reported the least disorientation whereas those who read the paged hypertext reported the most disorientation. Of the participants with more hypertext experience, those who read the paged hypertext reported the least disorientation while those who read the scrolling text reported the most disorientation. Of the participants who were low in working memory capacity, those who read the scrolling text produced higher recall scores than those who read the paged hypertext. The text formats appeared to influence how much time the participants spent reading the texts and in turn affected the participants' recall scores.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)171-195
Number of pages25
JournalJournal of Educational Computing Research
Volume30
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2004
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Computer Science Applications

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