Intraspecific polyploidy correlates with colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in Heuchera cylindrica

Thomas J. Anneberg, Kari Segraves

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Premise: Polyploidy is known to cause physiological changes in plants which, in turn, can affect species interactions. One major physiological change predicted in polyploid plants is a heightened demand for growth-limiting nutrients. Consequently, we expect polyploidy to cause an increased reliance on the belowground mutualists that supply these growth-limiting nutrients. An important first step in investigating how polyploidy affects nutritional mutualisms in plants, then, is to characterize differences in the rate at which diploids and polyploids interact with belowground mutualists. Methods: We used Heuchera cylindrica (Saxifragaceae) to test how polyploidy influences interactions with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). Here we first confirmed the presence of AMF in H. cylindrica, and then we used field-collected specimens to quantify and compare the presence of AMF structures while controlling for site-specific variation. Results: Tetraploids had higher colonization rates as measured by total, hyphal, and nutritional-exchange structures; however, we found that diploids and tetraploids did not differ in vesicle colonization rates. Conclusions: The results suggest that polyploidy may alter belowground nutritional mutualisms with plants. Because colonization by nutritional-exchange structures was higher in polyploids but vesicle colonization was not, polyploids might form stronger associations with their AMF partners. Controlled experiments are necessary to test whether this pattern is driven by the direct effect of polyploidy on AMF colonization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)894-900
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Botany
Volume106
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2019

Fingerprint

Heuchera
polyploidy
Polyploidy
mycorrhizal fungi
Fungi
colonization
fungus
vesicle
Tetraploidy
Diploidy
nutrient
tetraploidy
Saxifragaceae
diploidy
Food
nutrients
Growth

Keywords

  • arbuscular mycorrhizae
  • arbuscules
  • belowground species interactions
  • coils
  • hyphae
  • mutualism
  • polyploidy
  • Saxifragaceae
  • vesicles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Genetics
  • Plant Science

Cite this

Intraspecific polyploidy correlates with colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in Heuchera cylindrica. / Anneberg, Thomas J.; Segraves, Kari.

In: American Journal of Botany, Vol. 106, No. 6, 01.06.2019, p. 894-900.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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