Intergenerational differences and similarities in life-sustaining treatment attitudes and decision factors

Terry L. Mills, Janet M. Wilmoth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

A cross-sectional sample of members of 3-generation families was used to evaluate life-sustaining medical treatment attitudes and decision factors for oneself and for parents. Results show that the older generation (G1) perceived mental capacity, family burden, and pain as the most important considerations. Among the middle generation (G2), family burden was not an important factor, but the type of life-sustaining treatment was important. The youngest generation (G3) was similar to the other two generations in that mental capacity and pain were important, but a smaller percentage of the G3s considered this important.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)46-54
Number of pages9
JournalFamily Relations
Volume51
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Decision making
  • Family
  • Intergenerational relationships
  • Medical treatment
  • Quality of life

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Intergenerational differences and similarities in life-sustaining treatment attitudes and decision factors'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this