¿Importa Dónde Vivimos? How regional variation informs our understanding of diabetes and hypertension prevalence among older Latino populations

Catherine García, Jennifer A. Ailshire

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

A substantial body of research has found aging Latinos to be disproportionately affected by diabetes and hypertension. However, less research has examined whether these health conditions vary by region among Latino subgroups. We argue that the health of older Latinos varies considerably by region as each geographical location reflects unique historical, cultural, and demographic contexts that may affect health in later life. Consequently, our study builds on previous research by distinguishing five Latino subgroups by national-origin to examine regional variation in diabetes and hypertension among adults aged 50 and older using data from the 2000-2015 National Health Interview Survey. Our results find region to be an important factor for the prevalence of diabetes and hypertension among older Latinos. Specifically, we find that Mexicans exhibited a higher prevalence of diabetes in the Midwest, South, andWest regions compared to theirWhite counterparts, and a higher prevalence of hypertension in the South than Whites. Puerto Ricans have a higher prevalence of diabetes in all regions compared to Whites, and a higher prevalence of hypertension in the Northeast than Whites. Dominicans in theNortheast have a higher prevalence of diabetes and hypertension than Whites. Central/South Americans in the South and West have a higher prevalence of diabetes than Whites. Conversely, Cubans did not differ fromWhites in the prevalence of diabetes or hypertension. Our work shows that for older Latinos, the mechanisms through which geographic context influences health should be at the forefront in unveiling Latino health disparities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationContextualizing Health and Aging in the Americas
Subtitle of host publicationEffects of Space, Time and Place
PublisherSpringer International Publishing
Pages39-62
Number of pages24
ISBN (Electronic)9783030005849
ISBN (Print)9783030005832
DOIs
StatePublished - 2019
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)
  • Psychology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

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