Implications of forest type and land tenure diversity for the sustainability of ecosystem services provided by northern Amazonia’s multiple-use tree species

Anthony R. Cummings, Jane M Read, Jose M.V. Fragoso

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Context: As global landscapes continue to change, the sustainability of the ecosystem services they support are increasingly coming into question. In the rapidly changing neotropics, multiple-use plants epitomize sources of ecosystem services. To sustain the relationship that exists between such plants and human populations, a sound understanding of their well-being is required. Objectives: Density data on multiple-use plants were compared across forest types and land tenure classes to understand the implications of these two spatial frames of reference for landscape sustainability. Methods: The density of an aggregate sample of seventeen multiple-use and a sub-sample of five species were examined relative to forest type and land tenure class across fourteen Rupununi, Southern Guyana, study sites. The examination of plant density based on the two sample sizes was used to make inferences on how the two frames of reference may impact landscape sustainability. Results: The mean density of the aggregate sample was highest in three of six forest types, but showed no statistical difference across land tenure classes. When individual species were considered mean densities showed no statistical difference across land tenure classes, but differences were observed for three species across forest types. Mean densities were highest in forest types within which swidden agriculture occurs and in the protected area where logging is prohibited. Conclusions: Our findings suggested that in changing tropical landscapes plant species distribution can be predicted by forest types, but land tenure classes may provide clearer signals as to where a species well-being and hence ecosystem services may be compromised.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)423-438
Number of pages16
JournalLandscape Ecology
Volume33
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2018

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multiple use
land tenure
ecosystem service
sustainability
well-being
Guyana
shifting cultivation
protected area
agriculture
examination

Keywords

  • Ecosystem services
  • Forest type
  • Land tenure
  • Landscape diversity
  • Landscape sustainability
  • Multiple-use plants
  • Tropical landscapes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Ecology
  • Nature and Landscape Conservation

Cite this

Implications of forest type and land tenure diversity for the sustainability of ecosystem services provided by northern Amazonia’s multiple-use tree species. / Cummings, Anthony R.; Read, Jane M; Fragoso, Jose M.V.

In: Landscape Ecology, Vol. 33, No. 3, 01.03.2018, p. 423-438.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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