Impact of voice-based interaction on learning practices and behavior of children

Subhasree Sengupta, Radhika Garg

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Abstract

Smart devices have become an integral part of the everyday lives of children. Today, children can even use voice-based interactions to interact with devices for a wide range of activities. Previous research has shown that voice-driven interfaces have a potential to offer a potent new mechanism for teaching, engaging, and supporting children in daily life. Our paper, therefore, argues that it is critical not only to investigate how children use voice-based interactions to communicate with devices (e.g., smart speakers) but also the nature of relationships that children form with these devices, the influence such use has on children’s learning and behavior, and the role that parents or guardians play in deciding the norms of use for children. We also propose to explicitly and intricately investigate complexities in use and its impact relative to entangled identities (conveyed through overlapping attributes of gender, ethnicity, race, class) and larger social systems. To this end, we propose to use Social Learning Theory to understand how children learn through observing and interacting with smart devices, specifically using voice-based commands. Methodologically, we will conduct participatory design sessions and follow-up interviews to get a nuanced understanding of how children mentally contextualize voice-enabled smart devices and how social influence (e.g., parental expectation/norms), social function of identification (e.g., children’s emotional connection with technology), and learning goals impact their usage patterns.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCEUR Workshop Proceedings
Volume2327
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019
Event2019 Joint ACM IUI Workshops, ACMIUI-WS 2019 - Los Angeles, United States
Duration: Mar 20 2019 → …

Fingerprint

Teaching

Keywords

  • Children’s behavior
  • Learning practices
  • Parasocial relationships
  • Social learning theory
  • Voice-based interactions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science(all)

Cite this

Impact of voice-based interaction on learning practices and behavior of children. / Sengupta, Subhasree; Garg, Radhika.

In: CEUR Workshop Proceedings, Vol. 2327, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

@article{ac915ccffd93447cb60c10655bc5385a,
title = "Impact of voice-based interaction on learning practices and behavior of children",
abstract = "Smart devices have become an integral part of the everyday lives of children. Today, children can even use voice-based interactions to interact with devices for a wide range of activities. Previous research has shown that voice-driven interfaces have a potential to offer a potent new mechanism for teaching, engaging, and supporting children in daily life. Our paper, therefore, argues that it is critical not only to investigate how children use voice-based interactions to communicate with devices (e.g., smart speakers) but also the nature of relationships that children form with these devices, the influence such use has on children’s learning and behavior, and the role that parents or guardians play in deciding the norms of use for children. We also propose to explicitly and intricately investigate complexities in use and its impact relative to entangled identities (conveyed through overlapping attributes of gender, ethnicity, race, class) and larger social systems. To this end, we propose to use Social Learning Theory to understand how children learn through observing and interacting with smart devices, specifically using voice-based commands. Methodologically, we will conduct participatory design sessions and follow-up interviews to get a nuanced understanding of how children mentally contextualize voice-enabled smart devices and how social influence (e.g., parental expectation/norms), social function of identification (e.g., children’s emotional connection with technology), and learning goals impact their usage patterns.",
keywords = "Children’s behavior, Learning practices, Parasocial relationships, Social learning theory, Voice-based interactions",
author = "Subhasree Sengupta and Radhika Garg",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "2327",
journal = "CEUR Workshop Proceedings",
issn = "1613-0073",
publisher = "CEUR-WS",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Impact of voice-based interaction on learning practices and behavior of children

AU - Sengupta, Subhasree

AU - Garg, Radhika

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Smart devices have become an integral part of the everyday lives of children. Today, children can even use voice-based interactions to interact with devices for a wide range of activities. Previous research has shown that voice-driven interfaces have a potential to offer a potent new mechanism for teaching, engaging, and supporting children in daily life. Our paper, therefore, argues that it is critical not only to investigate how children use voice-based interactions to communicate with devices (e.g., smart speakers) but also the nature of relationships that children form with these devices, the influence such use has on children’s learning and behavior, and the role that parents or guardians play in deciding the norms of use for children. We also propose to explicitly and intricately investigate complexities in use and its impact relative to entangled identities (conveyed through overlapping attributes of gender, ethnicity, race, class) and larger social systems. To this end, we propose to use Social Learning Theory to understand how children learn through observing and interacting with smart devices, specifically using voice-based commands. Methodologically, we will conduct participatory design sessions and follow-up interviews to get a nuanced understanding of how children mentally contextualize voice-enabled smart devices and how social influence (e.g., parental expectation/norms), social function of identification (e.g., children’s emotional connection with technology), and learning goals impact their usage patterns.

AB - Smart devices have become an integral part of the everyday lives of children. Today, children can even use voice-based interactions to interact with devices for a wide range of activities. Previous research has shown that voice-driven interfaces have a potential to offer a potent new mechanism for teaching, engaging, and supporting children in daily life. Our paper, therefore, argues that it is critical not only to investigate how children use voice-based interactions to communicate with devices (e.g., smart speakers) but also the nature of relationships that children form with these devices, the influence such use has on children’s learning and behavior, and the role that parents or guardians play in deciding the norms of use for children. We also propose to explicitly and intricately investigate complexities in use and its impact relative to entangled identities (conveyed through overlapping attributes of gender, ethnicity, race, class) and larger social systems. To this end, we propose to use Social Learning Theory to understand how children learn through observing and interacting with smart devices, specifically using voice-based commands. Methodologically, we will conduct participatory design sessions and follow-up interviews to get a nuanced understanding of how children mentally contextualize voice-enabled smart devices and how social influence (e.g., parental expectation/norms), social function of identification (e.g., children’s emotional connection with technology), and learning goals impact their usage patterns.

KW - Children’s behavior

KW - Learning practices

KW - Parasocial relationships

KW - Social learning theory

KW - Voice-based interactions

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85063211345&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85063211345&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Conference article

AN - SCOPUS:85063211345

VL - 2327

JO - CEUR Workshop Proceedings

JF - CEUR Workshop Proceedings

SN - 1613-0073

ER -