Immigrant and native-born differences in school stability and special education: Evidence from New York City

Dylan Conger, Amy Ellen Schwartz, Leanna Stiefel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

Using the literature on achievement differences as a framework and motivation, along with data on New York City students, we examine nativity differences in students rates of attendance, school mobility, school system exit, and special education participation. The results indicate that, holding demographic and school characteristics constant, foreign-born have higher attendance rates and lower rates of participation in special education than native-born. Among first graders, immigrants are also more likely to transfer schools and exit the school system between years than native-born, yet the patterns are different among older students. We also identify large variation according to birth region.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)403-432
Number of pages30
JournalInternational Migration Review
Volume41
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Demography
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Immigrant and native-born differences in school stability and special education: Evidence from New York City'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this