Identifying residual speech sound disorders in bilingual children: A Japanese-English case study

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: To describe(a) the assessment of residual speech sound disorders(SSDs) in bilinguals by distinguishing speech patterns associated with second language acquisition from patterns associated with misarticulations and(b) how assessment of domains such as speech motor control and phonological awareness can provide a more complete understanding of SSDs in bilinguals. Method: A review of Japanese phonology is provided to offer a context for understanding the transfer of Japanese to English productions. A case study of an 11-year-old is presented, demonstrating parallel speech assessments in English and Japanese. Speech motor and phonological awareness tasks were conducted in both languages. Results: Several patterns were observed in the participant's English that could be plausibly explained by the influence of Japanese phonology. However, errors indicating a residual SSD were observed in both Japanese and English. A speech motor assessment suggested possible speech motor control problems, and phonological awareness was judged to be within the typical range of performance in both languages. Conclusion: Understanding the phonological characteristics of the native language can help clinicians recognize speech patterns in the second language associated with transfer. Once these differences are understood, patterns associated with a residual SSD can be identified. Supplementing a relational speech analysis with measures of speech motor control and phonological awareness can provide a more comprehensive understanding of a client's strengths and needs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)73-85
Number of pages13
JournalAmerican journal of speech-language pathology
Volume20
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011

Keywords

  • Articulation
  • Assessment
  • Bilingualism
  • Residual speech sound disorders
  • Speech motor control

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Speech and Hearing

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