How voluntary online learning communities emerge in blended courses

Robert Heckman, Qing Li, Xue Xiao

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

A comparative case study used content analysis to observe the emergence of voluntary online learning communities in two blended courses. The study developed an interaction-based approach to analyze such communities, and found interesting similarities and differences between the two classes. One similarity is the emergence of three categories of students in each class: Core, Active, and Peripheral. The distribution of students into these three categories was almost identical, and appears to be similar to the widely observed bibliographic distribution regularity known as Bradford's Law.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 39th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS'06
Pages3c
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 17 2006
Event39th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS'06 - Kauai, HI, United States
Duration: Jan 4 2006Jan 7 2006

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences
Volume1
ISSN (Print)1530-1605

Other

Other39th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS'06
CountryUnited States
CityKauai, HI
Period1/4/061/7/06

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

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    Heckman, R., Li, Q., & Xiao, X. (2006). How voluntary online learning communities emerge in blended courses. In Proceedings of the 39th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS'06 (pp. 3c). [1579296] (Proceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences; Vol. 1). https://doi.org/10.1109/HICSS.2006.206