How Explicit Racial Prejudice Hurt Obama in the 2008 Election

Spencer Piston

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

132 Scopus citations

Abstract

Some commentators claim that white Americans put prejudice behind them when evaluating presidential candidates in 2008. Previous research examining whether white racism hurts black candidates has yielded mixed results. Fortunately, the presidential candidacy of Barack Obama provides an opportunity to examine more rigorously whether prejudice disadvantages black candidates. I also make use of an innovation in the measurement of racial stereotypes in the 2008 American National Election Studies survey, which yields higher levels of reporting of racial stereotypes among white respondents. I find that negative stereotypes about blacks significantly eroded white support for Barack Obama. Further, racial stereotypes do not predict support for previous Democratic presidential candidates or current prominent Democrats, indicating that white voters punished Obama for his race rather than his party affiliation. Finally, prejudice had a particularly large impact on the voting decisions of Independents and a substantial impact on Democrats but very little influence on Republicans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)431-451
Number of pages21
JournalPolitical Behavior
Volume32
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2010

Keywords

  • Electoral behavior
  • Prejudice
  • Race
  • Stereotypes
  • Survey

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science

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