High-fat meals do not impair postprandial endothelial function in HIV-infected and uninfected men

Gretchen E. Volpe, Christine A. Wanke, Cindy M. Imai, Kevin S. Heffernan, Jeffrey T. Kuvin, Alexandra Mangili

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Prior studies have demonstrated impaired endothelium-dependent flow-mediated dilation (FMD) in healthy subjects following a high-fat meal. Compared to uninfected individuals, HIV-infected persons have been shown to have impaired FMD. We examined the effect of two different high-fat meals on endothelial function in HIV-infected and uninfected men. We performed a randomized, parallel group crossover study comparing 47 white men [18 HIV-uninfected, 9 HIV-infected and antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naïve, and 20 HIV-infected men on ART]. Fasting participants consumed one of two randomly assigned high-fat meals of either saturated or polyunsaturated fat, followed at least 24 later by the other meal. Brachial artery ultrasound measurements to assess vascular reactivity were performed before and 3h after each dietary challenge. There was no significant difference in mean baseline or postprandial FMD between HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected participants (mean baseline FMD±SD, 9.0%±5 vs. 9.2%±5, p=0.9; mean postprandial FMD±SD, 9.0%±4.7 vs. 9.1%±4.7, p=0.96, respectively). No significant difference in baseline or postprandial change in FMD was found between meals or HIV treatment groups. Fasting lipids and glucose, CD4 + count, and viral load did not predict FMD in HIV-infected participants. In contrast to previous reports, this study did not demonstrate impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation after high-fat meals in either HIV-infected or HIV-uninfected men. Moreover, HIV infection itself may not be the primary explanation for the abnormal endothelial function reported in HIV-infected individuals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)881-887
Number of pages7
JournalAIDS Research and Human Retroviruses
Volume30
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Virology
  • Infectious Diseases

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