Health experience model of personal informatics: The case of a quantified self

Dong Hee Shin, Frank Biocca

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The “quantified self” movement and wearable devices with health monitoring and activity tracking functions are experiencing increased popularity, as they allow users to become more aware of their health-related behavior. This paper describes the user experience of the quantified self as examined through multiple methods. First, we surveyed people's motivations and attitudes toward the quantified self. Second, we investigated the psychological effects of the form of health feedback (comparative vs. non-comparative) and presentation mode (text vs. image) on users' health preservation tendencies to identify more effective ways of delivering health information to users. The results of this user model confirm the significant role of utility and hedonicity regarding their underlying link to confirmation, satisfaction, and continuance intention. A between-subjects experiment reveals that health information provided in a comparative and textual format is more effective in encouraging health preservation in participants than the identical information presented in a non-comparative image format. In addition, participants' health-consciousness is found to be a significant determinant of health preservation. The findings show that users' health experience relates both utilitarian and hedonic aspects of motivation. The findings establish a foundation for future wearable technologies through a heuristic quality assessment tool from a user-centered perspective.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)62-74
Number of pages13
JournalComputers in Human Behavior
Volume69
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2017

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Informatics
Ego
Health
Motivation
Pleasure
Consciousness
Psychology
Technology
Feedback
Equipment and Supplies

Keywords

  • Health behavior
  • Health information
  • Personal informatics
  • Quantified self
  • Wearable device

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Health experience model of personal informatics : The case of a quantified self. / Shin, Dong Hee; Biocca, Frank.

In: Computers in Human Behavior, Vol. 69, 01.04.2017, p. 62-74.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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