“Heads Up” for Creatine Supplementation and its Potential Applications for Brain Health and Function

Darren G. Candow, Scott C. Forbes, Sergej M. Ostojic, Konstantinos Prokopidis, Matt S. Stock, Kylie K. Harmon, Paul Faulkner

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

There is emerging interest regarding the potential beneficial effects of creatine supplementation on indices of brain health and function. Creatine supplementation can increase brain creatine stores, which may help explain some of the positive effects on measures of cognition and memory, especially in aging adults or during times of metabolic stress (i.e., sleep deprivation). Furthermore, creatine has shown promise for improving health outcome measures associated with muscular dystrophy, traumatic brain injury (including concussions in children), depression, and anxiety. However, whether any sex- or age-related differences exist in regard to creatine and indices of brain health and function is relatively unknown. The purpose of this narrative review is to: (1) provide an up-to-date summary and discussion of the current body of research focusing on creatine and indices of brain health and function and (2) discuss possible sex- and age-related differences in response to creatine supplementation on brain bioenergetics, measures of brain health and function, and neurological diseases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)49-65
Number of pages17
JournalSports Medicine
Volume53
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2023

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

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