Gold based core-shell nanoparticles as fuel cell catalysts

Mathew M Maye, Jin Luo, Sandy Chen, Wai B. Chan, H. Richard Nasland, Chuan Jian Zhong

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The preparation of Au and Au alloy nanoparticles as electrocatalysts in several reactions including methanol oxidation, CO oxidation, and oxygen reduction was studied to explore the potential use of such nanoparticles as fuel cell catalysts. Both electrochemical and thermal approaches were used to activate the catalysts. For the electrochemically-activated gold nanoparticles assembled on glassy carbon electrodes, which involved the application of a polarization potential to 800 mv, an anodic wave was observed for the oxidation of methanol in alkaline electrolytes, which closely matched the potential for Au oxide formation. In electrochemical quartz crystal nanobalance measurements, a mass wave was detected corresponding to this current wave, implying an initial product release followed by formation of surface oxygenated species. In comparison with the electrochemically-activated catalyst, similar results were observed for thermally activated Au catalysts. The catalytic activity upon activation was dependent on the nature of the molecular-wire agent used to assemble the nanoparticle catalysts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationACS Division of Fuel Chemistry, Preprints
Pages756
Number of pages1
Volume48
Edition2
StatePublished - Sep 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Fuel cells
Gold
Nanoparticles
Catalysts
Oxidation
Methanol
Electrocatalysts
Glassy carbon
Quartz
Catalyst activity
Chemical activation
Electrolytes
Wire
Polarization
Crystals
Electrodes
Oxides
Oxygen

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Energy(all)

Cite this

Maye, M. M., Luo, J., Chen, S., Chan, W. B., Nasland, H. R., & Zhong, C. J. (2003). Gold based core-shell nanoparticles as fuel cell catalysts. In ACS Division of Fuel Chemistry, Preprints (2 ed., Vol. 48, pp. 756)

Gold based core-shell nanoparticles as fuel cell catalysts. / Maye, Mathew M; Luo, Jin; Chen, Sandy; Chan, Wai B.; Nasland, H. Richard; Zhong, Chuan Jian.

ACS Division of Fuel Chemistry, Preprints. Vol. 48 2. ed. 2003. p. 756.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Maye, MM, Luo, J, Chen, S, Chan, WB, Nasland, HR & Zhong, CJ 2003, Gold based core-shell nanoparticles as fuel cell catalysts. in ACS Division of Fuel Chemistry, Preprints. 2 edn, vol. 48, pp. 756.
Maye MM, Luo J, Chen S, Chan WB, Nasland HR, Zhong CJ. Gold based core-shell nanoparticles as fuel cell catalysts. In ACS Division of Fuel Chemistry, Preprints. 2 ed. Vol. 48. 2003. p. 756
Maye, Mathew M ; Luo, Jin ; Chen, Sandy ; Chan, Wai B. ; Nasland, H. Richard ; Zhong, Chuan Jian. / Gold based core-shell nanoparticles as fuel cell catalysts. ACS Division of Fuel Chemistry, Preprints. Vol. 48 2. ed. 2003. pp. 756
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