Glacier loss and hydro-social risks in the Peruvian Andes

Bryan G. Mark, Adam French, Michel Baraer, Mark Carey, Jeffrey Bury, Kenneth R. Young, Molly H. Polk, Oliver Wigmore, Pablo Lagos, Ryan Crumley, Jeffrey M. McKenzie, Laura Lautz

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

Abstract

Accelerating glacier recession in tropical highlands and in the Peruvian Andes specifically is a manifestation of global climate change that is influencing the hydrologic cycle and impacting water resources across a range of socio-environmental systems. Despite predictions regarding the negative effects of long-term glacier decline on water availability, many uncertainties remain regarding the timing and variability of hydrologic changes and their impacts. To improve context-specific understandings of the effects of climate change and glacial melt on water resources in the tropical Andes, this article synthesizes results from long-term transdisciplinary research with new findings from two glacierized Peruvian watersheds to develop and apply a multi-level conceptual framework focused on the coupled biophysical and social determinants of water access and hydro-social risks in these settings. The framework identifies several interacting variables—hydrologic transformation, land cover change, perceptions of water availability, water use and infrastructure in local and regional economies, and water rights and governance—to broadly assess how glacier change is embedded with social risks and vulnerability across diverse water uses and sectors. The primary focus is on the Santa River watershed draining the Cordillera Blanca to the Pacific. Additional analysis of hydrologic change and water access in the geographically distinct Shullcas River watershed draining the Huaytapallana massif towards the city of Huancayo further illuminates the heterogeneous character of hydrologic risk and vulnerability in the Andes.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages61-76
Number of pages16
JournalGlobal and Planetary Change
Volume159
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017

Fingerprint

glacier
watershed
water
loss
water availability
water use
vulnerability
water resource
climate change
river
effect
draining
regional economy
local economy
conceptual framework
cordillera
global climate
land cover
infrastructure
melt

Keywords

  • Climate change
  • Coupled human-natural systems
  • Glacier recession
  • Peru
  • Transdisciplinary research
  • Water resources

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Global and Planetary Change
  • Oceanography

Cite this

Mark, B. G., French, A., Baraer, M., Carey, M., Bury, J., Young, K. R., ... Lautz, L. (2017). Glacier loss and hydro-social risks in the Peruvian Andes. Global and Planetary Change, 159, 61-76. DOI: 10.1016/j.gloplacha.2017.10.003

Glacier loss and hydro-social risks in the Peruvian Andes. / Mark, Bryan G.; French, Adam; Baraer, Michel; Carey, Mark; Bury, Jeffrey; Young, Kenneth R.; Polk, Molly H.; Wigmore, Oliver; Lagos, Pablo; Crumley, Ryan; McKenzie, Jeffrey M.; Lautz, Laura.

In: Global and Planetary Change, Vol. 159, 01.12.2017, p. 61-76.

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

Mark, BG, French, A, Baraer, M, Carey, M, Bury, J, Young, KR, Polk, MH, Wigmore, O, Lagos, P, Crumley, R, McKenzie, JM & Lautz, L 2017, 'Glacier loss and hydro-social risks in the Peruvian Andes' Global and Planetary Change, vol 159, pp. 61-76. DOI: 10.1016/j.gloplacha.2017.10.003
Mark BG, French A, Baraer M, Carey M, Bury J, Young KR et al. Glacier loss and hydro-social risks in the Peruvian Andes. Global and Planetary Change. 2017 Dec 1;159:61-76. Available from, DOI: 10.1016/j.gloplacha.2017.10.003
Mark, Bryan G. ; French, Adam ; Baraer, Michel ; Carey, Mark ; Bury, Jeffrey ; Young, Kenneth R. ; Polk, Molly H. ; Wigmore, Oliver ; Lagos, Pablo ; Crumley, Ryan ; McKenzie, Jeffrey M. ; Lautz, Laura. / Glacier loss and hydro-social risks in the Peruvian Andes. In: Global and Planetary Change. 2017 ; Vol. 159. pp. 61-76
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