Glacial deposits and landforms at the terminus of a Laurentide ice stream, Oneida Lake, New York, from multichannel seismic reflection data

Nicholas Zaremba, Christopher A. Scholz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The deglaciation record of the Ontario Lowland and Mohawk Valley of North America is important for constraining the retreat history of the Laurentide Ice Sheet, end-Pleistocene paleoclimate, and ice-sheet processes. The Mohawk Valley was an important meltwater drainage route during the last deglaciation, with the area around modern Oneida Lake acting as a valve for meltwater discharge into the North Atlantic Ocean. The Mohawk Valley was occupied by the Oneida Lobe and Oneida Ice Stream during the last deglacial period. Multichannel seismic reflection data can be used to generate images of preglacial surfaces and internal structures of glacial bedforms and proglacial lake deposits, thus contributing to studies of deglaciation. This paper uses 217 km of offshore multichannel seismic reflection data to image the entire Quaternary section of the Oneida basin. A proglacial lake and paleo-calving margin is interpreted, which likely accelerated the Oneida Ice Stream, resulting in elongated bedforms observed west of the lake. The glacial bedforms identified in this study are buried by proglacial lake deposits, indicating the Oneida basin contains a record of glacial meltwater processes, including a 60-m-thick proglacial interval in eastern Oneida Lake.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)129-146
Number of pages18
JournalQuaternary Research
Volume106
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 21 2022

Keywords

  • Calving margin
  • Glaciation
  • Multichannel seismic reflection data
  • North America
  • Older Dryas
  • Pleistocene
  • Proglacial lake deposits

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Earth-Surface Processes
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

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