Gender Schema, Gender Constancy, and Gender-Role Knowledge: The Roles of Cognitive Factors in Preschoolers' Gender-Role Stereotype Attributions

Gary D. Levy, D. Bruce Carter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

64 Scopus citations

Abstract

Investigated the influence of several cognitive components of children's gender-role development on their attributions of gender-role stereotypes to a particular sex. A total of 83 children (44 boys and 39 girls) completed a 2-part interview that assessed degree of gender schematization, gender-role knowledge, flexibility, and stage of gender constancy. Children also completed tasks assessing attributions of gender-role stereotypes to male and female figures. Results indicated that children's gender schematization and other cognitive gender schema factors were significantly associated with children's accuracy in attributing gender-role stereotypes to both males and females. In contrast, stage of gender constancy per se was not significantly correlated with any of children's gender-role stereotype attributions. The patterns of results offer further evidence of the importance of gender schemata in early gender-role development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)444-449
Number of pages6
JournalDevelopmental psychology
Volume25
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1989

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Demography
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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