Examining the interpersonal model of binge eating and loss of control over eating in women

Emily B. Ansell, Carlos M. Grilo, Marney A. White

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

52 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: This study examined the interpersonal model of binge eating (Wilfley et al., Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Group, New York: Basic Books, 2000; Wilfley et al., Arch Gen Psychiatry, 8, 713-721, 2002; Elliott et al., Behav Res Ther, 48, 424-428, 2010) which posits that interpersonal problems lead to negative affect which, in turn, triggers disordered eating. Method: The model was tested using data from 350 women obtained via an internet assessment method. Analyses examined direct and indirect effects, via depressive/negative affect, of interpersonal problems, including domains of affiliation and dominance on loss of control over eating, binge eating, and eating disorder psychopathology. Results: Interpersonal problems showed significant effects on binge eating and eating disorder psychopathology that were statistically mediated by depressive/negative affect. Affiliation showed significant effects on binge eating and eating disorder psychopathology with low affiliation effects statistically mediated by depressive/negative affect and high affiliation effects independent of depressive/negative affect. Discussion: These findings support the interpersonal model of binge eating and highlight the importance of examining specific types of interpersonal problems in understanding heterogeneity of individuals with eating disorder psychopathology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)43-50
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Eating Disorders
Volume45
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2012

Keywords

  • affiliation
  • binge eating
  • eating disorders
  • interpersonal problems
  • negative affect

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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