Evidence of continued reduction in the age-at-death disparity between adults with and without intellectual and/or developmental disabilities

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1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: This study examines recent trends in the age-at-death disparity between adults with and without intellectual and/or developmental disabilities in the United States. Method: Data were from the 2005–2017 U.S. death certificates. Average age at death was compared between adults whose death certificate did or did not report an intellectual and/or developmental disability. Results: Age at death increased minimally for adults without, but markedly for adults with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities. As a result, the age-at-death disparity decreased: 2.2 years between adults with/without intellectual disability; 1.9 years between adults with/without Down syndrome; 2.7 years between adults with/without cerebral palsy; and 5.1 years between adults with/without rare developmental disabilities. Conclusion: Evidence from this study demonstrates that the age-at-death disparity between adults who did or did not have an intellectual and/or developmental disability reported on their death certificate continues to decrease, but the magnitude of the remaining disparity varied considerably by type of disability.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • Down syndrome
  • age-at-death
  • cerebral palsy
  • developmental disability
  • disparity
  • intellectual disability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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