Everyday instruction: A comparison of Mexican American and Anglo mothers and their preschool children

Robert P. Moreno

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

Building on previous research, this study examines the teaching behaviors of Mexican American and Anglo mothers using an everyday task. The study focuses on two questions: What are the differences in the teaching behaviors of Mexican American and Anglo mothers? How do these maternal teaching behaviors relate to their children's performance? The sample consisted of 36 mother-child dyads, 17 Mexican American and 19 Anglo American. The children's mean ages were 53.4 months (SD = 6.8 months). The results of the study demonstrate that not only are Mexican American mothers effective instructors of their children, their teaching behavior differs significantly from their Anglo counterparts. Specifically, contrary to previous research, Mexican American mothers were found to use less controlling and nonverbal teaching behaviors (i.e., commands, corrections, physical control, and modeling) when instructing their children. The two groups also differed with respect to the association between maternal teaching behaviors and children's performance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)527-539
Number of pages13
JournalHispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences
Volume19
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1997

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Cultural Studies
  • Anthropology
  • Linguistics and Language

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