Evaluating the effectiveness of faith-based breast health education

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: In an effort to evaluate the effectiveness of faith-based health promotion programmes in educating African American women about breast cancer knowledge and risks, the local affiliate of a national breast cancer research foundation funded the Genesis Health Project (GHP) Network, a community-designed, culturally competent intervention, to develop, implement and evaluate the Breast Cancer Awareness and Education Program. This article reports on the faith-based education model used and uses evaluation data to determine whether the intervention improved awareness of breast cancer risk, methods for reducing risk, the importance of early detection and the availability of low-cost or free mammograms. Design: Pastoral health messaging and culturally appropriate strategies were used to heighten awareness of breast cancer risks and prevention, promote mammography and early detection, increase awareness of free/low-cost mammography and encourage the adoption of healthier behaviours. Setting: African American churches and collaborators targeting African American women in a mid-sized city in the northeastern USA. Method: Summative evaluations used paper and pencil pre- and post-event surveys, with measures for objectives targeted by the programme to evaluate the impact of activities. Results: Overall, participants in the Breast Cancer Awareness and Education Program showed improvements in general knowledge about breast cancer, higher breast cancer mortality among African American women, warning signs, risks and ways to mitigate risk, and the availability of low-cost or free mammograms. Conclusion: Findings confirm that faith-based health promotion programmes can be effective in helping to educate inner-city African American women about breast cancer and associated risk factors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalHealth Education Journal
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - May 1 2018

Fingerprint

Health Education
Breast
Breast Neoplasms
African Americans
Mammography
Health Promotion
Education
Costs and Cost Analysis
Health
Mortality

Keywords

  • African American women
  • breast cancer
  • effectiveness
  • faith-based health promotion
  • mammogram

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

@article{04ab5e2cfdc54fbe9ebc08a8a09b5a8b,
title = "Evaluating the effectiveness of faith-based breast health education",
abstract = "Objective: In an effort to evaluate the effectiveness of faith-based health promotion programmes in educating African American women about breast cancer knowledge and risks, the local affiliate of a national breast cancer research foundation funded the Genesis Health Project (GHP) Network, a community-designed, culturally competent intervention, to develop, implement and evaluate the Breast Cancer Awareness and Education Program. This article reports on the faith-based education model used and uses evaluation data to determine whether the intervention improved awareness of breast cancer risk, methods for reducing risk, the importance of early detection and the availability of low-cost or free mammograms. Design: Pastoral health messaging and culturally appropriate strategies were used to heighten awareness of breast cancer risks and prevention, promote mammography and early detection, increase awareness of free/low-cost mammography and encourage the adoption of healthier behaviours. Setting: African American churches and collaborators targeting African American women in a mid-sized city in the northeastern USA. Method: Summative evaluations used paper and pencil pre- and post-event surveys, with measures for objectives targeted by the programme to evaluate the impact of activities. Results: Overall, participants in the Breast Cancer Awareness and Education Program showed improvements in general knowledge about breast cancer, higher breast cancer mortality among African American women, warning signs, risks and ways to mitigate risk, and the availability of low-cost or free mammograms. Conclusion: Findings confirm that faith-based health promotion programmes can be effective in helping to educate inner-city African American women about breast cancer and associated risk factors.",
keywords = "African American women, breast cancer, effectiveness, faith-based health promotion, mammogram",
author = "Brown, {Maria T} and Luvenia Cowart",
year = "2018",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0017896918778308",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Health Education Journal",
issn = "0017-8969",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Evaluating the effectiveness of faith-based breast health education

AU - Brown, Maria T

AU - Cowart, Luvenia

PY - 2018/5/1

Y1 - 2018/5/1

N2 - Objective: In an effort to evaluate the effectiveness of faith-based health promotion programmes in educating African American women about breast cancer knowledge and risks, the local affiliate of a national breast cancer research foundation funded the Genesis Health Project (GHP) Network, a community-designed, culturally competent intervention, to develop, implement and evaluate the Breast Cancer Awareness and Education Program. This article reports on the faith-based education model used and uses evaluation data to determine whether the intervention improved awareness of breast cancer risk, methods for reducing risk, the importance of early detection and the availability of low-cost or free mammograms. Design: Pastoral health messaging and culturally appropriate strategies were used to heighten awareness of breast cancer risks and prevention, promote mammography and early detection, increase awareness of free/low-cost mammography and encourage the adoption of healthier behaviours. Setting: African American churches and collaborators targeting African American women in a mid-sized city in the northeastern USA. Method: Summative evaluations used paper and pencil pre- and post-event surveys, with measures for objectives targeted by the programme to evaluate the impact of activities. Results: Overall, participants in the Breast Cancer Awareness and Education Program showed improvements in general knowledge about breast cancer, higher breast cancer mortality among African American women, warning signs, risks and ways to mitigate risk, and the availability of low-cost or free mammograms. Conclusion: Findings confirm that faith-based health promotion programmes can be effective in helping to educate inner-city African American women about breast cancer and associated risk factors.

AB - Objective: In an effort to evaluate the effectiveness of faith-based health promotion programmes in educating African American women about breast cancer knowledge and risks, the local affiliate of a national breast cancer research foundation funded the Genesis Health Project (GHP) Network, a community-designed, culturally competent intervention, to develop, implement and evaluate the Breast Cancer Awareness and Education Program. This article reports on the faith-based education model used and uses evaluation data to determine whether the intervention improved awareness of breast cancer risk, methods for reducing risk, the importance of early detection and the availability of low-cost or free mammograms. Design: Pastoral health messaging and culturally appropriate strategies were used to heighten awareness of breast cancer risks and prevention, promote mammography and early detection, increase awareness of free/low-cost mammography and encourage the adoption of healthier behaviours. Setting: African American churches and collaborators targeting African American women in a mid-sized city in the northeastern USA. Method: Summative evaluations used paper and pencil pre- and post-event surveys, with measures for objectives targeted by the programme to evaluate the impact of activities. Results: Overall, participants in the Breast Cancer Awareness and Education Program showed improvements in general knowledge about breast cancer, higher breast cancer mortality among African American women, warning signs, risks and ways to mitigate risk, and the availability of low-cost or free mammograms. Conclusion: Findings confirm that faith-based health promotion programmes can be effective in helping to educate inner-city African American women about breast cancer and associated risk factors.

KW - African American women

KW - breast cancer

KW - effectiveness

KW - faith-based health promotion

KW - mammogram

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85047898183&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85047898183&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0017896918778308

DO - 10.1177/0017896918778308

M3 - Article

JO - Health Education Journal

JF - Health Education Journal

SN - 0017-8969

ER -