Evaluating a two-step approach to sexual risk reduction in a publicly-funded STI clinic: Rationale, design, and baseline data from the Health Improvement Project-Rochester (HIP-R)

Michael P. Carey, Peter A. Vanable, Theresa E. Senn, Patricia Coury-Doniger, Marguerite A. Urban

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Sexually transmitted infection (STI) clinics provide an opportune setting for HIV prevention efforts. This randomized controlled trial evaluated a unique, two-step approach to sexual risk reduction at a publicly-funded STI clinic. Methods: During an initial visit, patients completed an audio-computer assisted self-interview (ACASI), were randomized to and received one of two brief interventions, obtained medical care, and completed a post-assessment. Next, two-thirds of the patients were assigned to attend an intensive sexual risk reduction workshop. At 3, 6, and 12 months, patients completed additional ACASIs and provided urine specimens to assess behavior change and incident STIs. Results: During a 28-month interval, 5613 patients were screened, 2691 were eligible, and 1483 consented to participate and were randomized; the modal reason for declining was lack of time (82%). Consenting patients included 688 women and 795 men; 64% of participants were African-American. The sample was low-income, with 57% reporting an annual income of less than $15,000; most participants (62%) had a high school education or less, and 51% were unemployed. Sexual risk behavior was common, as indicated by multiple sexual partners (mean = 32.8, lifetime; mean = 2.8, past 3 months), unprotected sex (mean = 17.3 episodes, past 3 months), and prior STIs (mean = 3.3, lifetime; 23% at baseline). Bivariate analyses confirmed our prediction that HIV-related motivation and behavioral skills would be related to current sexual risk behavior. All patients received a brief intervention; patient satisfaction ratings were uniformly high for both interventions (all means ≥ 3.7 on 4-point scales). Fifty-six percent of invited patients attended the intensive workshop, and attendance did not differ as a function of brief intervention. Patient satisfaction ratings were also uniformly positive for the workshop interventions (all means ≥ 3.6). Return to follow-up assessments exceeded 70%. Conclusions: Results demonstrate that implementing an HIV preventive program in a busy, public clinic is feasible and well-accepted by patients. Ongoing evaluation will determine if the interventions reduce sexual risk behavior and lower incident STIs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)569-586
Number of pages18
JournalContemporary Clinical Trials
Volume29
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2008

Keywords

  • African-Americans
  • HIV infections/prevention and control
  • Health promotion
  • Intervention studies
  • Randomized controlled trial
  • Sexual behavior
  • Sexually transmitted diseases/prevention and control
  • Unsafe sex

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)

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