Estimated pulse wave velocity is associated with residual-specific mortality: findings from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

Kevin S. Heffernan, Sae Young Jae, Paul D. Loprinzi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Estimated pulse wave velocity (ePWV) is emerging as a predictor of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. Approximately one-third of all deaths are not related to the top nine causes of mortality as defined by the CDC. We examined the association of ePWV with residual-specific mortality in a large sample of US adults. METHODS: Data from the 1999-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) were used (n = 13 909 adults between the ages of 18-85 years), with follow-up through 2011 (mean follow-up, 104 months). ePWV was calculated from a regression equation using age and mean blood pressure. RESULTS: After adjusting for age, pulse pressure, race/ethnicity, blood lipids, glucose, C-reactive protein, eGFR, smoking, self-reported physical activity, history of hypertension and diabetes, for every 1 m/s increase in ePWV, there was a 17% increased risk of residual-specific mortality (hazard ratio = 1.17, 95% CI = 1.02-1.36; P = 0.03). If using a previously recommended clinical cut-point of 10 m/s, those with an elevated ePWV had an increased risk of 57% (hazard ratio = 1.57; 95% CI = 0.98-2.50; P = 0.06). CONCLUSION: ePWV is associated with residual-specific mortality in a nationally representative sample of adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)698-702
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of hypertension
Volume39
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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