Entry and degree attainment in STEM: The intersection of gender and race/ethnicity

Yingyi Ma, Yan Liu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This study focused on entry to and attainment of bachelor's degrees in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields, by examining gender and race/ethnicity in an intersectional manner and paying particular attention to STEM subfields. The intersectional analysis extends previous research findings that female students are more likely to persist in college once they are in a STEM field and further reveals that racial minority women share the same tendency of persistence with white women. Women and racial minorities are most under-represented in physical-STEM fields. Our analysis reveals that black men would have had the highest probability to graduate in physical-STEM fields, had they had the family socioeconomic background and academic preparations of Asian males. This highlights the critical importance of family socioeconomic background and academic preparations, which improves the odds for STEM degree attainment for all groups. Out of these groups, black students would have experienced the most drastic progress.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number89
JournalSocial Sciences
Volume6
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 8 2017

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ethnicity
mathematics
engineering
gender
science
minority
bachelor
female student
persistence
Group
graduate
student

Keywords

  • Gender
  • Intersection
  • Persistence
  • Race
  • STEM

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Entry and degree attainment in STEM : The intersection of gender and race/ethnicity. / Ma, Yingyi; Liu, Yan.

In: Social Sciences, Vol. 6, No. 3, 89, 08.08.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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