Enacting food sovereignty in Aotearoa New Zealand and Peru: revitalizing Indigenous knowledge, food practices and ecological philosophies

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article reports on a cross-cultural study of two Indigenous1 knowledge and food security systems: Quechua2 people of Peru and Māori3 of Aotearoa–New Zealand, and implications for food systems sustainability and traditional knowledge. This study takes a novel approach by using a traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) lens to examine respective “good living principles” of Allin Kawsay/Buen Vivir in Peru and of Mauri Ora in Aotearoa in safeguarding food security. In this study, I introduce the “Khipu Model” as a source of knowledge production and sovereignty guiding the development of an Indigenous research-based framework. Drawing on over 45 interviews, with elders, community leaders, and people engaged in sustainable food production in Peru and Aotearoa. I show that an Indigenous “food security policy framework” underpinned by a set of cultural and environmental indicators of wellbeing resonates with conceptualizations of food sovereignty, whereas the dominant food security approaches do not. I argue that such a framework enacts practices of food sovereignty and represents a tool of Indigenous resurgence and social change in food politics for the revitalization of Indigenous food sovereignty as an alternative sustainable food system.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1003-1028
Number of pages26
JournalAgroecology and Sustainable Food Systems
Volume42
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 21 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • food security
  • food sovereignty
  • good living/Buen Vivir
  • Indigenous peoples
  • Khipu Model
  • Mauri Ora
  • Sustainable food systems
  • TEK

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment
  • Development
  • Agronomy and Crop Science

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Enacting food sovereignty in Aotearoa New Zealand and Peru: revitalizing Indigenous knowledge, food practices and ecological philosophies'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this