Effects of Prevalent and Newly Diagnosed Arthritis on Changes in Perceived Physical Demands and Work Stress Among Older Workers: Results of a 3 Year Panel Study

Miriam Mutambudzi, Kene Henkens

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: Examine the effects of prevalent and newly diagnosed arthritis on changes in perceived physical demands and general work stress. Methods: Conditional change logistic regression models examined the strength of association between arthritis and perceived (1) work stress and (2) physical demands, using data from the NIDI Pension Panel Study (n = 2099). Results: Prevalent and newly diagnosed arthritis were associated with increased odds of perceived work stress and high physical demands. Manual workers with newly diagnosed arthritis exhibited a 6.73-fold (95% CI = 2.87–15.77) increased odds of physical demands. Arthritis in three body extremities was differentially associated with increased odds of work stress and physical demands in manual and non-manual workers. Discussion: Prevalent and incident arthritis were associated with changes in work stress and physical demands in older workers. Policies and workplace interventions to reduce stress and physical demands and improve workability in older workers with arthritis are needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Aging and Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • aging workforce
  • impact of health on work
  • manual and non-manual workers
  • work demands
  • work-related stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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