Effects of lifestyle modifications on C-reactive protein: contribution of weight loss and improved aerobic capacity

Sae Young Jae, Bo Fernhall, Kevin S. Heffernan, Mihye Jeong, Eun Mi Chun, Jidong Sung, Sun Hee Lee, Yun Jeong Lim, Won Hah Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Scopus citations

Abstract

High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We analyzed the effects of lifestyle modifications including exercise training on hs-CRP in 47 overweight and obese adults. Subjects were divided into a lifestyle modification group (n = 23) (exercise and diet instruction) and a control group (n = 24) who did not participate in any lifestyle modification. After 3 months, body weight (80.8 ± 11.5 to 73.5 ± 10.7 kg, P < .01), total cholesterol (217 ± 38.4 to 178.0 ± 25.6 mg/dL, P < .01), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (151.3 ± 34.9 to 116.7 ± 27.8 mg/dL, P < .01), Vo2peak (30.3 ± 5.1 to 37.1 ± 6.9 mL/[kg · min], P < .01), and log hs-CRP (0.75 ± 0.4 to 0.56 ± 0.3 mg/dL, P = .01) were significantly improved in the lifestyle modification group, but there was no significant improvement in the control group. Changes in log hs-CRP were associated with changes in Vo2peak (r = -0.41, P = .004) and changes in weight loss (r = 0.42, P = .004). In stepwise multiple regression analysis, weight loss (P = .034) and improved Vo2peak (P = .039) were independent predictors of the changes in hs-CRP. When grouped into quartiles according to decreasing weight and increasing Vo2peak, levels of changes in log hs-CRP improved across quartiles of weight loss (P < .05) and improved Vo2peak (P < .01). Thus, lifestyle changes including regular exercise training in overweight and obese adults decreased hs-CRP, and this was associated with weight loss and improved Vo2peak.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)825-831
Number of pages7
JournalMetabolism: Clinical and Experimental
Volume55
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology

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