Effects of alcohol and expectancies on HIV-related risk perception and behavioral skills in heterosexual women

Stephen A. Maisto, Michael P. Carey, Kate B. Carey, Jennifer L. Schum, Christopher M. Gordon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

79 Scopus citations

Abstract

This experiment tested the effects of alcohol and expectancies on determinants of safer sex according to the information-motivation-behavioral skills model. Sixty heterosexual women attended 2 sessions. During Session 1, participants completed a set of descriptive measures; during Session 2 they were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 beverage conditions: control, alcohol-low (.35 gm alcohol/kg body weight), alcohol-moderate (.70 gm alcohol/kg body weight), or placebo. After beverage consumption, all participants completed measures of motivation to engage in risky sex and condom use negotiation skills. Results showed that the higher dose of alcohol and stronger alcohol expectancies were associated with greater motivation to engage in risky sexual behavior. However, perceived intoxication, rather than actual alcohol consumption or expectancies, was the best predictor of condom use negotiation skills. Integration of the findings with past research and their implication for the design of HIV-prevention programs are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)288-297
Number of pages10
JournalExperimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2004

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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