Effective Mitigation of Anchoring Bias, Projection Bias, and Representativeness Bias from Serious Game-based Training

Benjamin A. Clegg, Brian McKernan, Rosa M. Martey, Sarah M. Taylor, Jennifer Stromer-Galley, Kate Kenski, E. Tobi Saulnier, Matthew G. Rhodes, James E. Folkestad, Elizabeth McLaren, Adrienne Shaw, Tomek Strzalkowski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although human use of heuristics can result in ‘fast and frugal’ decision-making, those prepotent tendencies can also impair our ability to make optimal choices. Previous work had suggested such cognitive biases are resistant to mitigation training. Serious games offer a method to incorporate desirable elements into a training experience, and allow the use of mechanisms that enhance learning and retention. We developed a game to train recognition and mitigation of three forms of cognitive bias: anchoring, a tendency to be inordinately influenced by one piece of information; projection, an implicit assumption that others think or know what you do; and representativeness, judging the likelihood of a hypothesis by how much the available data resembles it. Participants were randomly assigned to play the training game once, twice spaced by 10 to 12 days, or a control condition that used a training video. External questionnaire-based assessments were given immediately post-training and 12 weeks later. Superior training was seen from the game. An independent group using our training game with their own novel bias assessment instruments (to which the researchers and game-developers had no access or content information) validated the key finding. These results demonstrate the viability and high value of using serious computer games to train mitigation of cognitive biases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1558-1565
Number of pages8
JournalProcedia Manufacturing
Volume3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

Fingerprint

Computer games
Decision making
Serious games

Keywords

  • Bias mitigation
  • Serious computer games
  • Training

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

Cite this

Effective Mitigation of Anchoring Bias, Projection Bias, and Representativeness Bias from Serious Game-based Training. / Clegg, Benjamin A.; McKernan, Brian; Martey, Rosa M.; Taylor, Sarah M.; Stromer-Galley, Jennifer; Kenski, Kate; Saulnier, E. Tobi; Rhodes, Matthew G.; Folkestad, James E.; McLaren, Elizabeth; Shaw, Adrienne; Strzalkowski, Tomek.

In: Procedia Manufacturing, Vol. 3, 2015, p. 1558-1565.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Clegg, BA, McKernan, B, Martey, RM, Taylor, SM, Stromer-Galley, J, Kenski, K, Saulnier, ET, Rhodes, MG, Folkestad, JE, McLaren, E, Shaw, A & Strzalkowski, T 2015, 'Effective Mitigation of Anchoring Bias, Projection Bias, and Representativeness Bias from Serious Game-based Training', Procedia Manufacturing, vol. 3, pp. 1558-1565. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.promfg.2015.07.438
Clegg, Benjamin A. ; McKernan, Brian ; Martey, Rosa M. ; Taylor, Sarah M. ; Stromer-Galley, Jennifer ; Kenski, Kate ; Saulnier, E. Tobi ; Rhodes, Matthew G. ; Folkestad, James E. ; McLaren, Elizabeth ; Shaw, Adrienne ; Strzalkowski, Tomek. / Effective Mitigation of Anchoring Bias, Projection Bias, and Representativeness Bias from Serious Game-based Training. In: Procedia Manufacturing. 2015 ; Vol. 3. pp. 1558-1565.
@article{fcd5d913192044358b31a4bb166f2ceb,
title = "Effective Mitigation of Anchoring Bias, Projection Bias, and Representativeness Bias from Serious Game-based Training",
abstract = "Although human use of heuristics can result in ‘fast and frugal’ decision-making, those prepotent tendencies can also impair our ability to make optimal choices. Previous work had suggested such cognitive biases are resistant to mitigation training. Serious games offer a method to incorporate desirable elements into a training experience, and allow the use of mechanisms that enhance learning and retention. We developed a game to train recognition and mitigation of three forms of cognitive bias: anchoring, a tendency to be inordinately influenced by one piece of information; projection, an implicit assumption that others think or know what you do; and representativeness, judging the likelihood of a hypothesis by how much the available data resembles it. Participants were randomly assigned to play the training game once, twice spaced by 10 to 12 days, or a control condition that used a training video. External questionnaire-based assessments were given immediately post-training and 12 weeks later. Superior training was seen from the game. An independent group using our training game with their own novel bias assessment instruments (to which the researchers and game-developers had no access or content information) validated the key finding. These results demonstrate the viability and high value of using serious computer games to train mitigation of cognitive biases.",
keywords = "Bias mitigation, Serious computer games, Training",
author = "Clegg, {Benjamin A.} and Brian McKernan and Martey, {Rosa M.} and Taylor, {Sarah M.} and Jennifer Stromer-Galley and Kate Kenski and Saulnier, {E. Tobi} and Rhodes, {Matthew G.} and Folkestad, {James E.} and Elizabeth McLaren and Adrienne Shaw and Tomek Strzalkowski",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1016/j.promfg.2015.07.438",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "3",
pages = "1558--1565",
journal = "Procedia Manufacturing",
issn = "2351-9789",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effective Mitigation of Anchoring Bias, Projection Bias, and Representativeness Bias from Serious Game-based Training

AU - Clegg, Benjamin A.

AU - McKernan, Brian

AU - Martey, Rosa M.

AU - Taylor, Sarah M.

AU - Stromer-Galley, Jennifer

AU - Kenski, Kate

AU - Saulnier, E. Tobi

AU - Rhodes, Matthew G.

AU - Folkestad, James E.

AU - McLaren, Elizabeth

AU - Shaw, Adrienne

AU - Strzalkowski, Tomek

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Although human use of heuristics can result in ‘fast and frugal’ decision-making, those prepotent tendencies can also impair our ability to make optimal choices. Previous work had suggested such cognitive biases are resistant to mitigation training. Serious games offer a method to incorporate desirable elements into a training experience, and allow the use of mechanisms that enhance learning and retention. We developed a game to train recognition and mitigation of three forms of cognitive bias: anchoring, a tendency to be inordinately influenced by one piece of information; projection, an implicit assumption that others think or know what you do; and representativeness, judging the likelihood of a hypothesis by how much the available data resembles it. Participants were randomly assigned to play the training game once, twice spaced by 10 to 12 days, or a control condition that used a training video. External questionnaire-based assessments were given immediately post-training and 12 weeks later. Superior training was seen from the game. An independent group using our training game with their own novel bias assessment instruments (to which the researchers and game-developers had no access or content information) validated the key finding. These results demonstrate the viability and high value of using serious computer games to train mitigation of cognitive biases.

AB - Although human use of heuristics can result in ‘fast and frugal’ decision-making, those prepotent tendencies can also impair our ability to make optimal choices. Previous work had suggested such cognitive biases are resistant to mitigation training. Serious games offer a method to incorporate desirable elements into a training experience, and allow the use of mechanisms that enhance learning and retention. We developed a game to train recognition and mitigation of three forms of cognitive bias: anchoring, a tendency to be inordinately influenced by one piece of information; projection, an implicit assumption that others think or know what you do; and representativeness, judging the likelihood of a hypothesis by how much the available data resembles it. Participants were randomly assigned to play the training game once, twice spaced by 10 to 12 days, or a control condition that used a training video. External questionnaire-based assessments were given immediately post-training and 12 weeks later. Superior training was seen from the game. An independent group using our training game with their own novel bias assessment instruments (to which the researchers and game-developers had no access or content information) validated the key finding. These results demonstrate the viability and high value of using serious computer games to train mitigation of cognitive biases.

KW - Bias mitigation

KW - Serious computer games

KW - Training

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85009958961&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85009958961&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.promfg.2015.07.438

DO - 10.1016/j.promfg.2015.07.438

M3 - Article

VL - 3

SP - 1558

EP - 1565

JO - Procedia Manufacturing

JF - Procedia Manufacturing

SN - 2351-9789

ER -