Effect of hemoglobin concentration variation on the accuracy and precision of glucose analysis using tissue modulated, noninvasive, in vivoRaman spectroscopy of human blood: A small clinical study

Joseph Chaiken, William Finney, Paul E. Knudson, Ruth S. Weinstock, Muhktar Khan, Rebecca J. Bussjager, Douglas Hagrman, Pamela Hagrman, Yiwei Zhao, Charles M. Peterson, Karen Peterson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Tissue modulated Raman spectroscopy was used noninvasively to measure blood glucose concentration in people with type I, and type II diabetes with HemoCue fingerstick measurements being used as reference. Including all of the 49 measurements, a Clarke error grid analysis of the noninvasive measurements showed that 72% were A range, i.e., clinically accurate, 20% were B range, i.e., clinically benign, with the remaining 8% of measurements being essentially erroneous, i.e., C, D, or E range. Rejection of 11 outliers gave a correlation coefficient of 0.80, a standard deviation of 22 mg/dL with p<0.0001 for N=38 and places all but one of the measurements in the A and B ranges. The distribution of deviations of the noninvasive glucose measurements from the fingerstick glucose measurements is consistent with the suggestion that there are at least two systematic components in addition to the random noise associated with shot noise, charge coupled device spiking, and human factors. One component is consistent with the known variation of fingerstick glucose concentration measurements from laboratory reference measurements made using plasma or whole blood. A weak but significant correlation between the deviations of noninvasive measurements from fingerstick glucose measurements and the test subject's hemoglobin concentration was also observed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number031111
JournalJournal of Biomedical Optics
Volume10
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2005

Fingerprint

Hemoglobin
hemoglobin
glucose
blood
Glucose
Spectrum Analysis
Hemoglobins
Blood
Spectroscopy
Tissue
spectroscopy
Raman Spectrum Analysis
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Blood Glucose
Equipment and Supplies
Clinical Studies
deviation
spiking
Shot noise
shot noise

Keywords

  • Metabolic monitoring
  • Noninvasive glucose
  • Raman spectroscopy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Biomaterials
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology
  • Clinical Biochemistry

Cite this

Effect of hemoglobin concentration variation on the accuracy and precision of glucose analysis using tissue modulated, noninvasive, in vivoRaman spectroscopy of human blood : A small clinical study. / Chaiken, Joseph; Finney, William; Knudson, Paul E.; Weinstock, Ruth S.; Khan, Muhktar; Bussjager, Rebecca J.; Hagrman, Douglas; Hagrman, Pamela; Zhao, Yiwei; Peterson, Charles M.; Peterson, Karen.

In: Journal of Biomedical Optics, Vol. 10, No. 3, 031111, 05.2005.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chaiken, Joseph ; Finney, William ; Knudson, Paul E. ; Weinstock, Ruth S. ; Khan, Muhktar ; Bussjager, Rebecca J. ; Hagrman, Douglas ; Hagrman, Pamela ; Zhao, Yiwei ; Peterson, Charles M. ; Peterson, Karen. / Effect of hemoglobin concentration variation on the accuracy and precision of glucose analysis using tissue modulated, noninvasive, in vivoRaman spectroscopy of human blood : A small clinical study. In: Journal of Biomedical Optics. 2005 ; Vol. 10, No. 3.
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