Economic Well-Being Among Older-Adult Households: Variation by Veteran and Disability Status

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7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This analysis uses data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) to examine whether veteran and disability statuses are jointly associated with poverty and material hardship among households that include an older adult. Compared to households that do not include a person with a disability or veteran, disabled nonveteran households are more likely to be in poverty and to experience home hardship, medical hardship, and bill-paying hardship. Disabled veteran households are not significantly different in terms of poverty, but exhibit the highest odds of home hardship, medical hardship, bill-paying hardship, and food insufficiency. The implications for social work practice are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)399-419
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Gerontological Social Work
Volume58
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - May 19 2015

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Veterans
Poverty
well-being
disability
Economics
poverty
bill
Patient-Centered Care
economics
social work
Disabled Persons
Social Work
food
income
participation
human being
Food
experience

Keywords

  • disability
  • material hardship
  • poverty
  • veteran status

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Nursing (miscellaneous)

Cite this

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abstract = "This analysis uses data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) to examine whether veteran and disability statuses are jointly associated with poverty and material hardship among households that include an older adult. Compared to households that do not include a person with a disability or veteran, disabled nonveteran households are more likely to be in poverty and to experience home hardship, medical hardship, and bill-paying hardship. Disabled veteran households are not significantly different in terms of poverty, but exhibit the highest odds of home hardship, medical hardship, bill-paying hardship, and food insufficiency. The implications for social work practice are discussed.",
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