Drinking motives mediate the associations between urgency and hazardous/harmful alcohol use among moderate-to-heavy drinking men who have sex with men (MSM)

Kyle R. Anderson, Tibor P. Palfai, Stephen A. Maisto, Jeffrey S. Simons

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Urgency, the tendency to act rashly under extreme emotions, has been associated with higher rates of hazardous/harmful drinking. Moreover, previous work suggests that the association between urgency and hazardous/harmful drinking may be mediated by drinking motives. The current study sought to replicate and extend this research to men who have sex with men (MSM), a population that has shown increased alcohol-related health risk behavior. Methods: Two-hundred-and-fifty-six moderate-to-heavy drinking MSM completed questionnaires assessing urgency, drinking motives, and hazardous/harmful drinking. Regression models were conducted to examine the direct effect of Urgency on heavy episodic drinking and alcohol-related consequences and its indirect effects on these outcomes through drinking motives. Results: Urgency was significantly associated with heavy episodic drinking and alcohol-related consequences. Bootstrapping procedures indicated significant indirect effects through coping and enhancement motives for both outcomes and also conformity for consequences. Conclusions: These results indicate urgency may be an important risk factor for hazardous/harmful drinking among adult MSM that may operate in part through its effects on coping and enhancement motives.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number106520
JournalAddictive Behaviors
Volume110
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2020

Keywords

  • Alcohol
  • HIV Prevention
  • Heavy Drinking
  • Men who have Sex with Men (MSM)
  • Urgency

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Toxicology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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