Does Initiating Vaginal Sexual Intercourse During a Safer Sex Media Campaign Influence Life Satisfaction Among African American Adolescents?

Keith J. Zullig, Robert F. Valois, Gerald R. Hobbs, Daniel Romer, Larry K. Brown, Ralph J. DiClemente, Peter A. Vanable

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: Addressing adolescent sexual risk behaviors in the STI/HIV prevention literature is well documented; however, intervention impacts on life satisfaction are relatively unexplored. This study is a secondary analysis of data (N = 1,658) from a randomized, multisite, multilevel safer sex media campaign (Project iMPPACS) analyzing life satisfaction across baseline and follow-up data collected from 2006 to 2008 among participants (mean age 15.08 years) who reported never having had vaginal sex at baseline (n = 787). Methods: Participants were separated into groups based on whether they reported having vaginal sex (yes/no) at baseline. Then taking into account the nested study design and controlling for confounders, a mixed model repeated measures analysis of variance assessed whether differences in mean total life satisfaction (LS) were associated across time in the media and nonmedia study conditions separately by gender. Results: A significant interaction between time and media condition was detected (p = .039) where mean total LS increased +.065 units from baseline (M = 5.364) to last contact in media cities and decreased −.084 units from baseline (M = 5.557) to last contact in nonmedia cities when controlling for the effect of initiating vaginal sex. No significant differences in LS at baseline were observed between media and nonmedia intervention cities. Results by gender suggest most positive change in LS was observed for females with mixed findings for males. Conclusions: Although Project iMPPACS was not designed with the intent on improving participants’ life satisfaction, results advance the LS literature by demonstrating a temporal sequence for sexual risk taking and LS over time.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Adolescent Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

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Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • African Americans
  • HIV
  • Intervention
  • Life satisfaction
  • Prevention
  • Randomized trial
  • STI
  • Subjective well-being

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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