Do Men Care about Childcare? Women's Relative Resources and Men's Preferences for Work-Family Reconciliation Policies

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Existing literature on the politics of work-family reconciliation policies focuses primarily on women and their policy preferences as the main driver of recent policy expansions. But what do we know about male preferences? This article explores this question in an innovative way by integrating insights from economic and sociological studies of division of labor and bargaining within the household. It investigates the link between women's relative resources within the household and their male partners' preferences for different types of reconciliation policies. Drawing on regression analysis of nineteen OECD countries using the International Social Survey Program data (Family and Changing Gender Roles IV), we find that: (1) men in dual-earner households, men in college-educated educational homogamy, and men in educational hypogamy (the woman is better educated) are more likely to support reconciliation policies; and (2) women's earnings and education have different effects on men's preferences.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)321-346
Number of pages26
JournalSocial Politics
Volume31
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2024

Keywords

  • bargaining
  • childcare
  • division of labor
  • economic dependency
  • gender
  • household
  • parental leave
  • policy preference
  • work-family reconciliation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gender Studies
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Do Men Care about Childcare? Women's Relative Resources and Men's Preferences for Work-Family Reconciliation Policies'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this