Do Giving Circles Democratize Philanthropy? Donor Identity and Giving to Historically Marginalized Groups

Julia L. Carboni, Angela M. Eikenberry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

This research focuses on understanding how giving circle (GC) member identities are associated with the identities of funding recipients. It examines whether GC members are more likely than non-members to give to people who are like them (bonding social capital) and/or to people who are not like them (bridging social capital). We draw on data from a survey of GC members and a comparison control group of non-GC members. Findings show GC members and those not in GCs are both more likely to give to a shared identity group—related to race, gender, and gender identity—leading to bonding social capital. However, GC members are more likely than those not in GCs to give to groups that do not share their identity, suggesting GCs also encourage bridging social capital. We assert both bonding and bridging social capital might lead to the democratization of philanthropy by expanding giving to historically marginalized groups.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)247-256
Number of pages10
JournalVoluntas
Volume32
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2021

Keywords

  • Democratization
  • Giving circles
  • Identity
  • Philanthropy
  • Social capital

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business and International Management
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Public Administration
  • Strategy and Management

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