Disqualified in the human race: A close reading of the autobiographies of individuals identified as autistic

Christine E. Ashby, Julie N. Causton-Theoharis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Much can be learned about the experience of autism by listening to the voices of individuals so labelled. They describe their understanding of competence, living in a culture where autism is considered deviant, deficient and outside the range of 'normal' human experience. This paper utilises autobiographical accounts written by individuals who identify as autistic as a source of qualitative research data and specifically explores the ways in which these texts address issues of competence. Using narrative inquiry, it explores how individuals with autism, both adults and adolescents, describe their own notions of competence and, further, the instructional practices that support their ability to demonstrate their competence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)501-516
Number of pages16
JournalInternational Journal of Inclusive Education
Volume13
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2009

Keywords

  • Autism
  • Autobiography
  • Competence
  • Inclusion
  • Inclusive education
  • Intelligence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

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