Discipline and publish: Reading and writing the scholarly network

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

I would like to begin this chapter with a call to my colleagues in Writing Studies to recognize the importance of writing. There is a sense, of course, in which such a call is absurd: One might reply to my call by pointing out the thousands of writing courses we oversee annually, or the thousands of pages of scholarship published and/or presented about various aspects of writing each year. A great deal of the research that we do in this fi eld is devoted to understanding, describing, and explaining the writing that others do, and our day-to-day lives in institutions of higher learning are taken up with prompting, improving, and supporting the students with whom we work. A call to recognize the importance of writing, given its ubiquity in our professional lives, can only ever be facetious, right?.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationEcology, Writing Theory, and New Media
Subtitle of host publicationWriting Ecology
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages92-105
Number of pages14
ISBN (Electronic)9781136482434
ISBN (Print)9780415897044
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities(all)
  • Social Sciences(all)

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    Brooke, C. G. (2011). Discipline and publish: Reading and writing the scholarly network. In Ecology, Writing Theory, and New Media: Writing Ecology (pp. 92-105). Taylor and Francis. https://doi.org/10.4324/9780203134696-8